Map: Positions of Gaddafi forces near Yefren and Al Qalaa

This map, posted by Amazigh_Libya on May 22nd shows the position of Gaddafi forces around the towns of Yefren and Al Qalaa. The area has been under siege for 2 months.

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15 Responses to Map: Positions of Gaddafi forces near Yefren and Al Qalaa

  1. Fredy says:

    Have the freedom fighters and Nato tried cutting the blue dots roads of supply ?

    • just one person in england says:

      Hi Fredy,

      I think they aren’t allowed to do that under the UN resolution. Ordinary civilian infrastructure like bridges and roads and utilities can’t be attacked. I agree it might be militarily desirable though.

      • patriot says:

        This is NATO against Libya as it is they have already broken a lot of laws. With the current desperation anything is possible…

        • just one person in england says:

          “they have already broken a lot of laws”

          Not that I’ve noticed. What are you referring to?

          BTW, It is NATO against the Gadaffy regime, not NATO against Libya, unless you think Gadaffy and Libya are the same thing.

          • patriot says:

            1 – Targetting head of state
            2 – Killing of civilians in bombings
            3 – Taking sides in civil war
            4 – Supporting a council that doesn’t represent the majority of Libyans
            5 – Destroying infrastructure

            NATO against Libyan people. The rebels can’t be classified as Libyan nationals anymore coz they support colonialists that are destroying their own country. NATO and the puppets are one thing.

          • just one person in england says:

            1 – Targetting head of state.
            a) How to prove that they did that, in a court of law?
            b) It would arguably be legitimate anyway, as he could be considered as military personnel.
            c) For sure, I would prefer it if he was caught and put on public trial.

            2 – Killing of civilians in bombings
            a) Not deliberate, tried extremely hard to avoid it. Not criminal, just very sad.
            b) Who built the military infrastructure right beside or underneath civilian buildings in the first place? It is illegal in the Geneva convention you perhaps don’t care about, to use civilians as human shields for military targets.

            3 – Taking sides in civil war
            a) Civil war? What civil war? It’s just civil disobedience 8-). Those bad people are disobediently refusing to be civilly killed.
            b) Not if one side is a recognised aggressor.

            4 – Supporting a council that doesn’t represent the majority of Libyans
            a) The conditions for free elections do not yet exist so nobody knows for sure how many Libyans support either side.
            b) What law does that break anyway?
            c) It’s the only show in town that we can get any sense out of or have any faith in.
            d) The NTC is widely judged to have big enough support to make it a “legitimate interlocutor”, and it does not call itself a government, and isn’t treated as one.

            5 – Destroying infrastructure
            a) Military, within the UN resolution. Not illegal.
            b) Unlike poisoning wells and cutting off water supplies and shooting at aid ships on mercy missions etc.

          • patriot says:

            1 – Targetting head of state.
            a) How to prove that they did that, in a court of law?
            b) It would arguably be legitimate anyway, as he could be considered as military personnel.
            c) For sure, I would prefer it if he was caught and put on public trial.

            You are contradicting yourself too much and in the end you say its ok to target head of governmet which is against the law

            2 – Killing of civilians in bombings
            a) Not deliberate, tried extremely hard to avoid it. Not criminal, just very sad.
            b) Who built the military infrastructure right beside or underneath civilian buildings in the first place? It is illegal in the Geneva convention you perhaps don’t care about, to use civilians as human shields for military targets.

            You are trying to justify killing of few Libyans. Its not ok to kill even one Libyan. Imagine the outrage when one US citizen is killed. You think the blood of the Westerners is more valuable than that of others?

            3 – Taking sides in civil war
            a) Civil war? What civil war? It’s just civil disobedience 8-). Those bad people are disobediently refusing to be civilly killed.
            b) Not if one side is a recognised aggressor.

            Another contradiction, there is a war going on and you try to use “civil disobedience”.Its still civil. NATO has no right to be there.

            4 – Supporting a council that doesn’t represent the majority of Libyans
            a) The conditions for free elections do not yet exist so nobody knows for sure how many Libyans support either side.
            b) What law does that break anyway?
            c) It’s the only show in town that we can get any sense out of or have any faith in.
            d) The NTC is widely judged to have big enough support to make it a “legitimate interlocutor”, and it does not call itself a government, and isn’t treated as one.

            UN laws don’t allow for medling in other countries affairs. By supporting a body that is not member of UN while the member of UN exist in the same country, the West is breaking the rules.
            NTC is judged by who to have enough support? Why isn’t NTC winning then? Why does it need external Masters to do the job?

            5 – Destroying infrastructure
            a) Military, within the UN resolution. Not illegal.
            b) Unlike poisoning wells and cutting off water supplies and shooting at aid ships on mercy missions etc.

            Destroying civilian infrastructure is illegal. If you follow the news you will know how many have been destroyed. Even the residential house in which Gaddafi son was killed was not a military target. Who is allowing this to go on? UN.

  2. Fredy says:

    Here we go Patriot …..

    Hi JOP in England I appreciate your British sense of humor.

    The 1973 UN resolution has been raped. Ocampo is going to summon the UN.

    Extra , Extra.

    • patriot says:

      Ocampo is part of the camp.
      You know the resolution has been raped (glad you are seeing it even if subconciously).
      Its humour to you but the Libyan people are suffering.

  3. sarcastical says:

    Seems like “patriot” is blabbling his usual nonsense. Addmiteddly, one thing is appearing to be true:
    1. Targetting genocidal war criminal.

    • patriot says:

      What do I expect from “puppets” blog 🙂
      You will keep creating propaganda like whistling, burning cars, etc etc.
      Your masters took over the frequencies and popped propaganda, dropped leaflets, etc and still the true sons and daughters of Libya are defending their country.
      Proxies and puppets can’t win wars.

      • sarcastical says:

        You know what? I am here, because I am from nation, where two decades ago we throw out commies. So I can relate to current, way more bloodier, uprising against yet another tyrant. I write what I think. I have no master – this is just your projection and your denial.

        “What do I expect from “puppets” blog”
        What are you doing on Internet anyway? This kind of place is complete antithesis of what you are and what you represent.

        • patriot says:

          I have answered you before and you disappeared. I advise you to go back and read again since your memory is too short…

  4. Fredy says:

    Sarcastical where were you ?

    Sarcastical ?

    You hit the atom on the center.

    Where is Mercury and Adam ?

    Sarcastical is going to get you loyalists !

    Hi sarcastical , just having fun here.

  5. David says:

    They cut of those roads all this time they terrorize population and make them starve as it suits there goals.

    Here is Reuters article on this:
    (Reuters May 23) – The rebels said it would be easy: roll in, block the road, raise the flag — another village under their writ in Libya’s Western Mountains.

    The villagers are with us, the rebels said of their fellow Berbers — an ethnic minority that rose up against Muammar Gaddafi at the very start of the rebellion in February.

    “Only a few support Gaddafi, maybe five or six,” said Omar, commander of the rebel unit from the nearby town of Kabaw.

    His call-sign was Rambo. But the operation, which began on Sunday afternoon with the rebels gathering over coffee at a roadside cafe, ended an hour later in angry confrontation, tense retreat and a lesson in the divided loyalties and half-truths of this particular theater of Libya’s conflict.

    “Only seven or eight people here don’t like Gaddafi,” Mohammed, a resident of Tamzin, quietly told a reporter.

    The truth probably lay somewhere in the middle, like Tamzin itself and dozens of other towns and villages wedged between the rebels who hold most of the plateau and forces loyal to Gaddafi mainly in the desert plains.

    The rebels control a road running more than 200 kilometers across the top of the mountain range from the border with Tunisia, the war’s western front.

    They wanted to close an adjoining artery that cuts through Tamzin and down the mountainside to a town where pro-Gaddafi forces and their artillery are positioned, some 20 kilometers further on.

    The road was a security threat, they said, and arrived heavily armed in a convoy of around a dozen pick-up trucks, young rebels wrapped in the flag of the uprising.

    “BLACK OR WHITE”

    The Berber of the Western Mountains were among the first to hoist the rebel colors, seeing a chance to reassert an identity denied them under Gaddafi.

    But the Kabaw rebels were met by angry, unarmed Tamzin villagers, who, though ethnic kin, also happen to shop in the Gaddafi-held town in the plains, which, unlike the choked plateau, has an open route for goods from Tripoli.

    “This is the main road for us,” said a man who gave his name as Ali. “Food comes through it. If you close it off, we’ll die here.”

    Others appeared offended by the rebels, with their mud-smeared trucks and casual weapons-handling. “Why are they coming to my town with guns?” asked Mohammed, who said he worked for an oil company in Tripoli.

    “There are families here. I like my life, I like Gaddafi.”

    A few of the Libyan leader’s green flags were flying from pylons. Rebels said the Tamzin villagers were scared of the pro-Gaddafi forces such a short distance away.

    But allegiances are not always easy to discern in the Western Mountains, with sometimes fatal consequences.

    When rebels in Zintan, at the far eastern edge of the rebel-held strip, tried to cut off a road used by pro-Gaddafi forces near the village of Ryayna earlier this month, a shooting match erupted in which at least six rebels died.

    A commander blamed Gaddafi army snipers, but other rebels spoke of a clash with pro-Gaddafi villagers of a different tribe, enraged by the intrusion. Ryayna’s loyalties remain the subject of much speculation in Zintan.

    It is a question that may weigh heavily on this region once the war is over and the winners hold the losers to account.

    The rebels said they would return to Tamzin within two days.

    “I told them, ‘You are either with Gaddafi or with the rebels’,” the commander, Omar, said after the retreat. “It’s black or white, no grey.”

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