Gaddafi’s movements closely monitored, says NATO

The GuardianNATO forces are confident they are successfully tracking Colonel Muammar Gaddafi as he moves from hideout to hideout in Tripoli, the Guardian has learned.

But the coalition is abiding by the UN mandate, which does not permit the military to target the Libyan leader directly – commanders are still hoping that he will be removed by a revolt from within his circle of closest associates.

There is also a privately held wish in Whitehall that Gaddafi might be caught up in a legitimate bombing raid on a command and control cell as he flits from one safe haven to another.

A senior Whitehall source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said that Gaddafi’s movements were being monitored closely, and that the military had been able to track him “racing from one place to another” over recent weeks.

Nato has an array of surveillance equipment at its disposal: as well as a Nimrod plane and drones, HMS Liverpool, which is stationed off the Libyan coast, has listening systems which should enable the military to keep watch on the Libyan leader and his entourage.

The Ministry of Defence refused to be drawn on the issue, with sources reiterating that Gaddafi will not be targeted as long as Nato works within the parameters of UN resolution 1973.

With the coalition campaign now 100 days old, and pressure mounting over the growing humanitarian crisis in Libya, the MoD and the Foreign Office on Friday set out the gains it believes have been made, and tried to reassure Libyan rebels that Nato is doing all it can to bring a swift end to the conflict.

The briefing came at the end of a particularly difficult week – up to nine civilians were killed on Sunday after a Nato missile hit a home in Tripoli, an accident that prompted the Italian foreign minister Franco Frattini to call for a ceasefire.

Without giving details, a senior Foreign Office official claimed that Gaddafi was now displaying signs of “paranoid and erratic behaviour”.

The official said that the regime was being hit by a “steady stream of defections. Ambassadors, ministers – over 120 military officers including five generals left the country in May alone”.

The official added: “Gaddafi is down to a handful of followers, who rule by fear. Reports suggest Gaddafi has threatened to kill generals who do not deliver results around Misrata.”

The international criminal court is poised on Monday to issue arrest warrants on Gaddafi and two of his inner circle, he said.

Major General Nick Pope said that Nato had now undertaken more than 12,000 flying sorties, including 5,000 attack missions, of which 2,400 had hit regime targets – suggesting a less than 50% success rate.

He said that RAF planes had twice aborted missions in recent days because of concerns that civilians may be in danger – missiles had been fired, but diverted to wasteland at the last moment.

However, some EU countries remain frustrated by the slow rate of progress. At a summit in Brussels on Friday, the Belgian prime minister, Yves Leterme, said leaders “really have to see how we can achieve a definitive and decisive breakthrough” in the war.

Other nations remain concerned that Nato has already overstepped the terms of the UN resolution, and in the US, President Barack Obama is under pressure from Capitol Hill to justify America’s involvement in the campaign.

“The president has ignored the constitution and the war powers resolution, but he cannot ignore a lack of funding,” said Florida Republican representative Tom Rooney, who is proposing a bill to block money for the US military’s contribution to the Nato effort.

“Only Congress has the power to declare war and the power of the purse, and my bill exercises both of those powers by blocking funds for the war in Libya unless the president receives congressional authorisation.”

“The war in Libya is illegal, unconstitutional and unwarranted. It must end,” Ohio Democrat representative, Dennis Kucinich, said.

Obama has said he did not need to seek Congressional approval before authorising US forces to play a part in the Nato campaign.

Source: The Guardian

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25 Responses to Gaddafi’s movements closely monitored, says NATO

  1. Fredy says:

    Guardian , I never caught you bullshitting . I just did.

    Just some months ago the news said that the house where Gaddafi’s son was targeted because Maddafi was there. Now we get the twist.

    Nato has listening systems that can track what Gaddafi says ?

    Guardian this is not a 007 movie. This must be an American-Brittish joke.

    Nato has two faces one is serious and the other is dumb.

    Get serious Nato.

  2. cartographer says:

    “The revolutionaries have said they expect an offer from Gaddafi “very soon”

    Oh yeah??? This thug didnt get where he is today and for 42 years by pussyfooting and apologizing his way around to people that he sees as cockroaches and druggies. Get real people!! To get rid of a cancer you gotta zap it with radiation. Otherwise it will just grow and grow. Forget what fucking Zuma says (warning NATO today not to kill Gaddafi). Zap the bastard now he has killed and maimed enough of Libya’s precious small population.

  3. Fredy says:

    The consequences of radiation treatment is something worthy of trying with Daffy.

  4. cartographer says:

    From SKYNEWS 26 June
    “Muammar Gaddafi has renewed his offer to let the people of Libya vote on whether he should continue to lead the North African country.”

    Yeah sure. You dare to rise against me?? I will kill 15000 of you first. Wait a minute!! You say you want elections now? Yep, I can give you that too. I am mad but you aint gonna lose me.
    Reagan was never a bright spark, but when he coined “Looney Tunes” for the MADdafi, it was a defining moment, and still true 27 years later.

  5. cartographer says:

    He always said that he will take Libya with him. This is an insane crime on a national level just like Pol Pot of Cambodia. This link shows that the madman is now reaching an extremely dangerous point to all the residents of Tripoli. NATO aims to protect civilians so he must be eliminated right now

    http://shabablibya.org/news/libya-unveils-its-latest-weapon-against-nato-women-at-arms

  6. Fredy says:

    G women soldiers appearing excited on this link seem ready to engage the revolutionaries in Tripoli.

    Cartographer we may witness the role of women soldiers in the war in Libya.

  7. Free Azzawia says:

    if NATO would be able to peek into K’s war room and record him today, I believe the scene would be very much similar to the scene that appears on this link:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u9KbYm-C2B8&NR=1

  8. Richard from France says:

    This precisely points at the hypocrisy of he text issued but the UN (resolution 1973, and many others).
    The UN resolution says that UN must protect civilians. Right.
    But everybody knows very well that removing Kaddhafi is the only way to stop this war.
    So why to take a decision, while excluding the only way to carry on this decision to success?

    First reason is a bad understanding of ethics. Deliberately aiming at the leader of a country is certainly not fair play, but we cannot oppose this to the life of hundreds, sometimes millions of people. The life of tens of Libyans killed, injured or tortured everyday is much more important that Kaddhafi’s only life. So, whichever way we consider things, NOT sending a missile to Kaddhafi is a much greater sin than sending one. And anyways he can still surrender to the NATO, if he does not want to be killed. He has the choice, civilians targeted by his missiles do not have this choice.

    Second reason is the presence of dictatorships in the UN security council. These large countries have their place here, but, as dictatorships, what cen we expect of them, save constant shemanigans to undermine the effort of the UN toward peace and freedom? Typical hypocrisy is accepting the UN resolution, to look acceptable to the international opinion, while adding to the UN resolution a clause removing any efficiency.

    We however have the experience of the two Balkans war, where the UN decisions were mixed with false “ethics”, to send on the ground soldiers with their hands tied, while the medias presented the fascist aggression against innocents as an “ethnic conflict” involving everybody.

    • Mr. Gross says:

      Actually UN should bring a vote to disband Gaddafi from his post. When that passes….

      • Mr. Gross says:

        Plus the media which supports Gaddafi. The station should be destroyed.

        • Richard from France says:

          it is not a “military objective” strictly speaking. But it is certainly Kaddafi’s most dangerous weapon, as it spreads lies and make allies of the Libyans falter and hesitate. How many days of “fun” will Kaddafi earn thanks to this radio? How many people will be killed during this time? Take this number, it is the responsibility of Kaddafi’s State TV…

          So yes, it should be destroyed, or at least scrambled. We just need to destroy the antennas, no need to endanger any innocent worker.

      • Richard from France says:

        Yes exactly. But I bet it will be vetoed by China.

  9. Fredy says:

    There is also a privately held wish in Whitehall that Gaddafi might be caught up in a legitimate bombing raid on a command and control cell as he flits from one safe haven to another.

    A senior Whitehall source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said that Gaddafi’s movements were being monitored closely, and that the military had been able to track him “racing from one place to another” over recent weeks.

    Nato has an array of surveillance equipment at its disposal: as well as a Nimrod plane and drones, HMS Liverpool, which is stationed off the Libyan coast, has listening systems which should enable the military to keep watch on the Libyan leader and his entourage.

    Bologna !

  10. Richard from France says:

    At a pinch, it is not enough that only the leaders are punished by the International Court. Dictatorship and fascism exist only because psychopath leaders have gathered around them other psychopaths, to organize an “administration”, and “army” and the unavoidable “secret police”. Without them, a psychopath dictator is only a bad clown, unable to harm anybody.
    So the International Court should punish, not only the leaders, but also the thousands secret police, narks, etc. as for any crime.
    This may bring people to reflection, before engaging into such activities. And it would be SOOO helpful to the victims, to see ALL the culprits punished, instead of still seeing them roaming free in the street, see taunting them in the TV.

    Counter example: the french Maurice papon worked during WWII to track Jews. He was however keep safe by the French government, given high roles, and his “precious skills” were used to track Algerian activists during Algeria war. He was still a ministry until 1973 in the Giscard government. We had to wait for 1997 to see him in a court, where he received a lenient sentence. This story is a very good example of a prosecution against a state criminal, and all the difficulties this entails, including ideological obstacles from people who want to protect the privileges of the political class.

  11. Richard from France says:

    If the UN says that Gaddafi has lost his legitimacy as head of the libyan state, then he is just a soldier among others. So there is no reason to specially avoid hitting this peculiar soldier, when many others are targetted by the nATO every day.

  12. Fredy says:

    Many of this institutions like the UN have a hard time making clear decisions and handling the truth. Gaddafi should be handled like Osama Bin Laden .

    Just kill them, otherwise, they will see the weakness on us and they will make it harder to get them.

    I agree with you Rich.

  13. Fredy says:

    Many of these institutions like the UN have a hard time making clear decisions and handling the truth. Gaddafi should be handled like Osama Bin Laden .

    Just kill them, otherwise, they will see the weakness on us and they will make it harder to get them.

    I agree with you Rich.